New after-school program for middle schoolers in Belmont

We’re very excited to announce the launch of a new after-school program for middle school musicians: the SJW Giant Steps Middle School Band.

Directed by Dave Gregoric, and assisted by Steven Lugerner, David Hart, and Joshua Thurston-Milgrom, this fun big band focuses on developing improvisational skills, mastering jazz styles and articulations, and instilling good practice discipline.

Enrollment is open by audition only to any middle school musician currently enrolled in the music program at their school, within driving distance of Carlmont High School in Belmont, California.

Click here for the details of the program.

2014 SJW faculty announced

We’re pleased to announce the premilinary lineup for the 2014 Stanford Jazz Workshop faculty. We’re adding new faculty members every day, so please check our faculty page for detailed profiles and new additions. 

Jazz Day Camp

  • Kristen Strom (saxophone)
  • Dave Gregoric (trombone)
  • Josh Thurston-Milgrom (bass)

Jazz Camp

  • Sax: Jimmy Heath, Kristen Strom, Lynn Speakman
  • Trumpet: David Hart
  • Trombone: Dave Gregoric
  • Drums: Ndugu Chancler, Tootie Heath
  • Percussion: Tupac Mantilla
  • Piano: Jeb Patton, Taylor Eigsti, Bennett Paster Joe Gilman, Victor Lin
  • Voice: Sandy Cressman, Wendy McCain
  • Bass: Josh Thurston-Milgrom, Rob Kohler
  • Guitar: Dave Yamasaki, Scott Sorkin
  • Strings: Victor Lin

Jazz Institute

  • Special presentation: Chick Corea
  • Piano: Fred Hersch, George Cables, Taylor Eigsti, Dena DeRose, Benett Paster, Victor Lin
  • Drums: Peter Erskine, Jeff Ballard
  • Percussion: Tupac Mantilla
  • Guitar: Julian Lage
  • Bass: Larry Grenadier, Josh Thurston-Milgrom, Rob Kohler, David Wong
  • Sax: Jimmy Heath, Mark Turner, Dayna Stephens, Patrick Wolff
  • Trumpet: Jeremy Pelt
  • Voice: Madeline Eastman, Dena DeRose

Songwriting @ SJW

  • Cliff Goldmacher
  • Bonnie Hayes

Registration for 2014 SJW jazz immersion programs now open

Online registration is now open for all of our summer jazz immersion programs, including:

  • Jazz Day Camp, our five-day program for middle school musicians directed by Dave Gregoric and Kristen Strom
  • Jazz Camp, our popular immersion camp for teens
  • Jazz Institute, where adults and advanced young jazz musicians get to learn with jazz greats and jam with peers
  • Songwriting @ SJW, led by two renowned songwriting experts, Bonnie Hayes and Cliff Goldmache

Parents often ask us which SJW program is best for their children, so we’ve created this handy comparison chart to help make it easy to choose.

Want to have a virtual jazz immersion experience before you decide? Watch our video series for Jazz Camp and for Jazz Institute.

Financial aid is available for students aged 12 – 17, and application materials are due no later than March 24, 2013. Find out more here.

Register before February 1 to receive the $50 Early Bird discount toward tuition for Jazz Day Camp, Jazz Camp, Jazz Institute, and Songwriting @ SJW!

If you have any questions about registration, please email us at registrar@stanfordjazz.org or call 650-726-0324, extension 303.

The Jazz Institute Showcase schedule now available

Tonight’s the night! The Jazz Institute Showcase will feature almost 200 rising stars of jazz performing on four stages. How do you find out who is performing on which stage at which time? Download the Jazz Institute Showcase schedules for Combos and Trios and for Vocalists and Piano Trios in Braun below.

For Combos and Trios

  • Jazz Institute participants are listed alphabetically by last name
  • The center column indicates combos that rehearse in the early afternoon, which are known as “early combos”
  • The right column indicates combos that rehearse in the late afternoon, which are known as “late combos”
  • The numbers indicate the order in which the combos perform on a particular stage:
  • If your combo or trio is indicated as “05”, that means they will be the fifth to perform.
  • Performances begin at 7 p.m. in Dinkelspiel, Campbell, Braun Rehearsal Hall, and CoHo.
  • Each performance takes approximately 10 minutes, so a combo slated to perform fifth on the Dinkelspiel stage would begin at 7:40 p.m.
  • A combo slated to perform fourth in the CoHo would begin at  approximately 7:30 p.m.

Download the Combos and Trios schedule here.

For Vocalists and Piano Trios in Braun

  • Performances begin at 7 p.m. in Braun Rehearsal Hall, Room 110.
  • Vocalists and Piano Trio performances are listed in order; order number is indicated to the left of their name.
  • Vocal and Piano Trio performances take approximately 5 minutes, so a Jazz Institute musician slated to perform fourth in Braun Rehearsal Hall, Room 110, would begin at approximately 7:15.

Download the Vocalists and Piano Trios in Braun schedule here.

Jazz Camp Week 2 Showcase schedule now available

Tonight’s the night! The Jazz Camp Week 2 Showcase will feature 230 rising stars of jazz performing on four stages. How do you find out who is performing on which stage at which time? Download the Jazz Camp Showcase schedule below.

Here’s how the schedule is organized:

  • Jazz Camp participants are listed alphabetically by last name
  • The center column indicates combos that rehearse in the early afternoon, which are known as “early combos”
  • The right column indicates combos that rehearse in the late afternoon, which are known as “late combos”
  • Vocalists will perform in Braun Rehearsal Hall, Room 110, and their performance order is indicated in the center column

The numbers indicate the order in which the combos perform on a particular stage:

  • If your combo or vocalist is indicated as “05”, that means they will be the fifth to perform.
  • Performances begin at 7 p.m. on Dinkelspiel, Campbell, and Braun Rehearsal Hall; performances on the Outdoor Stage begin at 6 p.m.
  • Each performance takes approximately 10 minutes, so a combo slated to perform fifth on the Dinkelspiel stage would begin at 7:50 p.m.
  • A combo slated to perform eighth on the Outdoor stage would begin at  7:10 p.m.
  • Vocal performances take approximately 5 minutes, so a vocalist slated to perform fourth in Braun Rehearsal Hall, Romm 110, would begin at approximately 7:15.

Download a PDF of the schedule by clicking here! 

2013 SJW app ready for download

Now available for iOS, Android, and other mobile devices, the Stanford Jazz app gives you instant access to Jazz Festival tickets, Jazz Camp updates, SJW videos, and more! With the app you can:

  • purchase tickets to the Stanford Jazz Festival
  • get updates and alerts about Jazz Camp and Jazz Residency activities
  • get directions to Stanford Jazz venues
  • get special ticket offers
  • alerts of ticket availablity for sold-out shows

To get the app, just point your gizmo’s browser to stanfordjazz.org, and you’ll be prompted to download the appropriate app for your phone or mobile device. Find out more by clicking on the links below.

Get the Stanford Jazz Workshop app for iOS.

Get the Stanford Jazz Workshop app for Android.

Go to the Stanford Jazz Workshop mobile site.

Frank Sumares remembered

Frank teaching(2)Frank Sumares, pianist, composer, arranger, educator, and longtime SJW family member, passed away on March 28, at the age of 73. To give you a sense of how deeply Frank touched his students, colleagues, and band mates, and how much his influence has impacted their lives, we’d like to offer a selection of anecdotes and memories from SJW students and faculty.

I remember walking nervously into an evaluation room to play for Frank on my first day at the Stanford Jazz Workshop as a 13-year-old. I already knew who he was from seeing him perform in the Bay Area. Though I hadn’t yet learned all my major scales, I wanted to show him that I knew what a diminished scale, was because it was so “advanced.” I was afraid I’d mess up, but Frank was all jokes and smiles, and I soon forgot where I was and just played. He was a crucial source of encouragement throughout my education, giving me the advice and confidence I needed to play music for fun. Even when I returned years later to teach and perform at the SJW as an adult, Frank was full of helpful advice and warmth. I still use his handouts. I’ll miss you Frank. May your music live on in all of us.
—Pascal Le Boeuf

Frank and I were a mutual admiration society. Our career paths were strikingly similar. We both had successful careers as jazz band directors at the community college level, before moving to the university level, and we both worked as bay area professional musicians. Over the years, we judged many festivals together and I had a small part in him coming to Stanford to teach jazz piano. We shared many unique experiences, probably ther latest and most notable of which was us sharing what it was like conducting the Count Basie Orchestra. Frank did many clinics for me at Stanford with my Stanford Jazz Orchestra. He was undoubtedly one of best jazz educators I have had the experience of knowing. We will certainly miss him, his wit, and his hipness — and man could he swing! “Oh, by the way Frank, you still owe me a clinic!”
—Fred Berry

I first met Frank at about age 15 when I took his jazz theory class. That’s where I learned his adage, “Up your thirds, down your sevenths!” I also remember him greeting me with “ii-V-I, momma, get down!” Over the years at the Stanford Jazz Workshop or at San Jose State, I’d greet him as my Hayward home-boy. We saw each other over the years at SJW: I remember kvetching at lunch, hanging in his “office” in the lobby of Campbell. He’d always help my piano players who were having trouble. Last summer, we taught a class together on the last day of camp, talking to kids about continuing their musical experience beyond camp. I said, “You don’t need a whole band to play, you only need two!” So we played duo for the kids. We were having so much fun, laughing, playing stuff back and forth, that we made our point to the students. Good for them, but I was just so happy that I got to play with Frank!
—Kristen Strom

Frank was always there for students, willing to assist even the most beginning student the basics of jazz theory and harmony. My son, Ryan, had attended as a trumpeter and was required to take theory and harmony, something he of course had no clue about. In the course of the week, Ryan learned quite a lot from Frank, and every time our paths would cross Frank wold inquire about Ryan and how he was doing. Frank was a caring person who loved to share his knowledge of this music. In addition, he was one of the funniest guys around, alway making me and everyone else laugh! Frank will be missed for sure, but he leaves a legacy of what music education is about, and what it should be.
—Akira Tana


Frank_Sumares_jokingFirst, when I was in high school (in Carmichael, CA), I was playing in the jazz band and had no idea what to with all of those funny chord symbols and slashes on my music. My band director gave me a copy of Frank’s book on jazz piano voicings. It was the first I had ever heard of “comping,” and he opened up a whole new world of harmony to me. Thank you Frank!
Second, when I was a young jazz band director at American River College, Frank would frequently clinic my band at various festivals. His supportive, friendly, yet direct demeanor in front of me and my students was a big influence on my teaching and on my understanding of how to direct the band and communicate with students. Again, thank you so much Frank!
Third, as a fellow instructor at SJW, Frank was always around and available, always supportive an complimentary of what we were doing. He always had great stories about the music and a life in education. I always looked forward to talking with Frank and getting just a few more nuggets from him. I will sincerely miss Frank and his sly smile, and his exquisite mentoring. I will miss you sir!

—Joe Gilman

I will miss Frank tremendously at Jazz Camp. He was a pal, ever ready with his unstoppable sense of humor, and extremely generous with his musical knowledge and talent. Frank was very encouraging and helpful to me as teacher. I’ll always think of him with a smile in my heart.
—Wendy McCain

Frank had a delightful and self-deprecating sense of humor. I took his beginning jazz piano class at Stanford in 2002. He began the class by writing his name on the blackboard, “Frank Sumares.” Chalk in hand, he turned to the class and said, “You could call me Doctor Frank, but I don’t have a doctorate. You can call me Master Frank if you want to.”
—Bob Murphy

Frank_Sumares_Hip_StuffI was a student of Frank’s at Chabot College. I was terrible and a guitar player, and he specifically told me that he did not care for guitar players. But I didn’t care because he made me laugh everyday. Years after, I was on a late night BART train, with hardly anyone around. I sat down and after a minute or so, someone grabbed my neck from behind and said, “Give me your wallet!” I jumped up and turned — and there was Frank, laughing! That was the last time I saw him. He was really the most honest and best teacher i ever had.
—Jason Vanderford

Financial aid deadline this Friday

Early Bird discount deadline Friday, Feb. 1

The winter weather makes it seem as though summer is far away — but some Stanford Jazz Workshop summer jazz program deadlines are just around the corner!

Sign up for Jazz Day Camp, Jazz Camp, Jazz Institute for Youth, Jazz Institute for Adults, or our Songwriting @ SJW program by this Friday, February 1, to get the Early Bird tuition discount.

The next big deadline is March 1 for Financial Aid applications, but register as soon as you can, as there are supplemental application forms that you’ll need to complete and return to the Stanford Jazz Workshop so that we have them in our offices no later than March 1.

Registration is open!

Find out more about all of Stanford Jazz Workshop’s summer jazz camps and jazz immersion programs by clicking on Jazz Immersion Programs above, or right here. 

Registration for all our 2013 summer jazz programs is now open. Just click on the big red Register buttons, above and below. We look forward to seeing you this summer!